Tweeting in the classroom

Tweeting in the classroom

Social media is a foreign idea in the educational world.  This is unfortunate because it is a powerful resource for teachers to use to network, build relationships, share ideas, and explore new technologies that will benefit the students in their classroom.  I have found many educational resources through the following social websites: twitter, facebook, pinterest, librarything… the list can go on and on. This article talks about the top 10 twitter hash tags for educators to use! Start tweeting and start learning!

State of the Union Address

How fitting is it that President Obama addressed the need for technology in the classroom during his State of the Union Address last night? Of course, in this high-tech economy (that will only continue to grow) we must create compatible high-tech schools where America’s future workers can study, create, expand, and develop technologies that will change the way this world works. He’s right. Why should we be putting all our focus on high standardized test scores when other countries are making technological advances that we could never even imagine? It’s time we get with the program! Let us promise decent jobs to hard workers right out of High School who are experts in computers and engineering. Let us guide our students into the future, rather then holding them back in this outdated educational system.

“…Let’s also make sure that a high school diploma puts our kids on a path to a good job. Right now, countries like Germany focus on graduating their high school students with the equivalent of a technical degree from one of our community colleges, so that they’re ready for a job. At schools like P-Tech in Brooklyn, a collaboration between New York Public Schools, the City University of New York, and IBM, students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associate degree in computers or engineering.

We need to give every American student opportunities like this. Four years ago, we started Race to the Top – a competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards, for about 1 percent of what we spend on education each year. Tonight, I’m announcing a new challenge to redesign America’s high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy. We’ll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers, and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math – the skills today’s employers are looking for to fill jobs right now and in the future…”